spartanpodcast.com

PGR14.jpg Hear the Conversation 14:41 – 6.7 mb mp3

Project 60/50 is Michigan State University‘s yearlong conversation about civil and human rights. 2014 is the 60th anniversary of the dismantling of segregation of public schools in 1954 and the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibiting discrimination in vital areas of life in America. The project links academic exploration and study with public remembrance.

“The goal of this project is to open the door to anyone who has an interest in discussing these issues who has a particular view,” MSU’s director of the Office of Inclusion Paulette Granberry Russell tells Jennifer Orlando on MSU Today. “People should be able to express their views and raise important issues in a way that’s respected, even where we may disagree.

“And if we’re really going to impact the lingering issues of civil or human rights, it will be through conversations.”

Granberry Russell believes MSU has tapped into a need for people to discuss these issues “in a way that allows them to speak their mind in a way and in a space that’s respected where you can say what’s on your mind without being judged and shut down. And we’re going to find a way to sustain these conversations.”

Project 60/50 has no political agenda. It advocates only for the equal exchange of ideas and offers opportunities that are inclusive, showcasing MSU’s many intellectual talents in respectful ways.

DSpic.jpg Hear the Conversation 7:51 – 4.5 mb mp3

Michigan United States Senator Debbie Stabenow is a proud Michigan State University alumna.

MSU exposed me to all kinds of people from all kinds of backgrounds and really broadened my view of the world and gave me so many opportunities to learn so many different things. It really was the beginning of a journey of curiosity for me about learning.”

Senator Stabenow enjoys connecting with Spartans in Michigan, Washington, or wherever she’s traveling.

“In my role as a United States Senator, I’m extremely proud of the research and international role MSU plays around the world, and Michigan State has an incredible reputation as a premier agriculture and research institution.”

Senator Stabenow describes how proud she was to have President Obama sign the farm bill on the MSU campus and says the bill “is our food policy for the country and is really the economic development support for small communities.”

As for MSU’s future, she is concerned about making sure college is affordable and that funding is available for critical research. “We have to make sure going forward that young people have the same opportunities that I had to attend Michigan State.”

As for young Spartans who want to follow her into public service, Senator Stabenow advises them to “get a degree in something you’re passionate about and then get involved in the community.”

33.jpg Hear the Conversation 12:42 – 5.8 mb mp3

by Hannah Watts

After several years of modest growth, the Recruiting Trends report is showing an increase in hiring for newly-minted degree holders that is expected to jump a whopping 16 percent in 2014-15. The annual survey, produced in part by Michigan State University economist Phil Gardner, is the nation’s largest with nearly 5,700 companies responding.

“Employers are recruiting new college graduates at levels not seen since the dot-com frenzy of 1999-2000,” says Gardner, director of MSU’s Collegiate Employment Research Institute. “Competition for qualified candidates is escalating to a degree rarely seen in the past 10 years.

“Though economic news and forecasts aren’t always painted in positive ways in the media, we see companies growing in technologies and other areas where they need more people; there’s all the ingredients for a really positive job market.” Read more »

617.JPG Hear the Conversation 8:12 – 4.7 mb mp3

MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis host “Inside MSU Athletics with AD Mark Hollis” Wednesdays at noon on the Spartan Sports Network.

“It’s great fun to look at some other areas of athletics that we don’t usually talk about,” Westerman tells Steve Courtney on the October 4 WJR MSU Auto Owner’s Insurance Tailgate Show, “including all the sports medicine going on behind the scenes.”

“People make the difference, but to have state-of-the-art X-Ray technology steps from the field in our North End Zone facility allows us to examine student-athletes immediately and make assessments,” Hollis says.

On the future of intercollegiate athletics Hollis says “in five years we’ll be in a very good place. We’re not professional sports no matter who wants to define us that way.” MSU is committed to the student-athlete model at MSU, he says.

Hollis says many of his athletic director colleagues are “frightened by the period of time we’re in, but I’m embracing the inevitable changes because it’s our opportunity to make a positive change in sports and impact issues like domestic and sexual violence. Sports can be a leader in preventing these issues. That’s the real blessing that can come out of the sports world.”

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

October 2nd, 2014

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 53:30 min – 30 mb mp3

Detroit News columnist and associate business editor Daniel Howes joins Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for a wide-ranging conversation on the state of American education, our country’s political system, and the future of Detroit.

“We have a great chance now to get better practices in Detroit in terms of how the city operates, and we’re seeing billions of dollars in private investment coming in to Detroit. I have every reason to be positive that what we’re seeing is real and not chamber of commerce spin. The Detroit story will continue to be a positive one.”

MSU Research Vice President Stephen Hsu says it’s a fair question for taxpayers to wonder why we engage in research at universities like MSU.

“The research we engage in today is what will make the future awesome for our kids,” Hsu says. “It’s the basic research at universities that leads to advances in technology,” says Hsu.

Michigan State University alumna Jemele Hill, ’97, served as the grand marshal for MSU’s 2014 Homecoming Sept. 22-27. She talks with Russ White to close the show.

“I always tell people that I was born in Detroit, but raised at Michigan State University,” Hill says. “For me, MSU was a place where I truly feel like I came into my own.”

jhhc2.jpg Hear the Conversation 7:58 – 4.6 mb mp3

Michigan State University alumna Jemele Hill, ’97, served as the grand marshal for MSU’s 2014 Homecoming Sept. 22-27.

“I always tell people that I was born in Detroit, but raised at Michigan State University,” Hill says. “For me, MSU was a place where I truly feel like I came into my own.”

Hill believes that intercollegiate athletics is currently “in a state of chaos,” and believes “We’re on the edge of the utter collapse of the system.” Hill believes college athletes will eventually get paid. If that happens, “I think it will come at some emotional expense for people who, despite the sham of amateurism, like to believe in a certain ideal when it comes to college athletes.”

Hill is a graduate of MSU’s renowned journalism school.

“Now we’re in an age where being first matters more than being right; accuracy doesn’t seem to be an expectation and people are more distrustful of the media.”

But she says journalism still gets back to the same core principle “Can you tell people things that they didn’t know. As long as you can deliver information people don’t have, you’re going to have a job. The delivery method may not always be the same, but if you’re naturally curious and can ask the right questions and find information, you’ll always have a place in this business.”

Hill advises today’s j-school students to “practice the reporting; the writing will come.”

WS2.jpg Hear the Conversation 17:32 – 10 mb mp3

“Our goal is to provide news and information that is relevant to the residents of the state of Michigan; we’re the most listened to public radio service in the state of Michigan,” says Steve Schram, MSU alumnus and director of Michigan Public Media. He’s director of broadcasting for Michigan Radio. “Over half a million people listen each week on our broadcast signal alone. And about another 120,000 people each week listen to our streaming signal, not only in Michigan, but all over the U.S. and elsewhere around the world.”

Michigan Radio has over 30,000 members “and they provide 65 percent of the revenue that allows us to create the journalism we do. We’re very grateful for our audience that supports us.”

Schram talks about the generational differences in how people use media and says that while the broadcast signal still delivers the largest part of the audience every week “more than 63 percent of Michigan Radio and NPR listeners access our stream through mobile devices as opposed to websites on desktops.” Read more »

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

September 4th, 2014

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“The culture of the MSU Alumni Association has evolved from one of owing it to your university to join because of all it did for you to a culture of Spartans helping Spartans where we strive to find and connect Spartans to each other and to their communities so we can make the world a better place,” MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis.

MSUAA’s LENS program, says Westerman, “is lifelong enrichment for Spartans. We’ve moved away from career counseling to life empowerment where we hope to equip alumni with the skills for sustainable success.”

Longtime MSU journalism professor Sue Carter is MSU’s new faculty representative to the Big Ten and NCAA.

“In governance situations, there are three principle groups who have a voice – the presidents and chancellors, the athletic directors, and the faculty athletic representatives,” says Carter. “Members of these groups are critical in helping set term and tone for what happens in college athletics.

Carter visits with President Simon and MSU Vice President and Secretary to the Board of Trustees Bill Beekman.

“I represent MSU on various committees and councils dealing with things like budgets and student-athlete health. And I report back to and engage with the rest of the faculty.”

Westerman returns to the program to talk with MSU senior Gabriela Saldivia to get a student perspective on MSUAA and its mission.

Howes142.jpg Hear the Conversation 30:21 – 17.3 mb mp3

Detroit News columnist and associate business editor Daniel Howes joins Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for a wide-ranging conversation on the state of American education, our country’s political system, and the future of Detroit.

Howes is a fan of a traditional liberal arts education and believes that too much of a focus on preparing for a career often leaves the United States with “more people who have degrees, but who are less educated. A more broad-based approach to education serves more people and is better than a narrow approach. Education is more than just a transaction and a means to an end.”

“In order to have productive members of society in a democratic country such as our own requires its citizens to have a certain kind of broad-based education.” Read more »

making radio.JPG Hear the Conversation 15:54 – 9.1 mb mp3

“The culture of the MSU Alumni Association has evolved from one of owing it to your university to join because of all it did for you to a culture of Spartans helping Spartans where we strive to find and connect Spartans to each other and to their communities so we can make the world a better place,” MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis.

MSUAA’s LENS program, says Westerman, “is lifelong enrichment for Spartans. We’ve moved away from career counseling to life empowerment where we hope to equip alumni with the skills for sustainable success.”

Westerman says his next big goal is to “drive the alumni presence into the student experience.” He has changed the name and focus of the Student Alumni Foundation to the Association of Future Alumni.

“We seek to identify the men and women of vision who are going to become the next generation of significant donors who will fund our margin of excellence for the next generation.” Read more »

Copyright © 2014 spartanpodcast.com. All rights reserved.