spartanpodcast.com

Cotton.jpg Hear the Conversation 16:17 min – 9.3 mb mp3

Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis met with the media on December 16 and said he thinks it’s too early – before the first season of it is even complete – to decide whether the current four-team college football playoff is the sport’s best option for determining a champion.

“A lot of thought among AD’s and presidents needs to go into what we want college football to look like in the future,” says Hollis. And he says there are three important variables to consider: the student-athlete perspective, the institutional perspective, and the public and media perspective.

“There are a lot of great football teams out there in the country right now who feel like they’ve had a failed or a down season because they aren’t part of the four-team playoff. I’m not sure if the solution is to expand or reduce the field.” Read more »

prezphoto.jpg Hear the Conversation 22:17 min – 10.2 mb mp3

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon will serve as vice chairwoman of the Association of American Universities in the 2014-15 term, which will likely lead to her leading the prestigious group in 2015-16.

Founded in 1900 to advance the international standing of U.S. research universities, President Simon says the AAU today focuses on issues that are important to research-intensive universities like MSU, such as funding for research, research policy issues, and graduate and undergraduate education. AAU member universities are on the leading edge of innovation, scholarship, and solutions that contribute to the nation’s economy, security, and well-being.

George Will spoke at one of MSU’s December 2014 commencement ceremonies. His appearance at MSU stirred controversy due to comments he made in a column. Michael Moore addressed the graduates, too.

“Great universities are committed to serving the public good by creating space for discourse and exchange of ideas, though that exchange may be uncomfortable and will sometimes challenge values and beliefs,” says President Simon. “People can come to MSU and talk about their views, not because they’ve been labeled something, but because they have something to say.” Read more »

1mm.jpg Hear the Address 26:32 min – 12.1 mb mp3

“My speech today will be long, but at the end of it I will forgive all student debt,” quips renowned film maker Michael Moore to the December 2014 Michigan State University graduates. “I want to apologize on behalf of my generation” for the rise in cost of a college education “and I hope that you make it better for your children.”

Moore says he briefly attended U of M Flint, “and I personally want to thank you today for picking up a fallen Wolverine and showing him the straight path to a good future; thank you Spartans! Thank you Spartan Nation!”

“Michigan State played a very important role in my youth,” says Moore as he recounts how a Boys State experience at MSU in 1971 helped lead to important anti-discriminatory legislation being passed in Congress “all because I wanted a bag of Ruffles potato chips in the Brody dorm.

“Big things can happen from little actions and you don’t have to be anybody famous and you can be shy. But you’re citizens of a great country and you have invested powers in you, and actually one person can make a difference.”

Moore says it was “a horrible, great lesson for me to learn at 16, but it’s informed everything I’ve done since then.”

will.JPG Hear the Address 14:37 min – 6.7 mb mp3

“Washington is not a happy city these days,” renowned journalist George Will tells the December 2014 Michigan State University graduates. “We have a representative government, and its current discord accurately represents the country’s deep divisions about the proper role and actual competence of government.”

Will says “there are only 537 people in Washington there because the people sent them there, and I wish all 537 of them would come to this campus and stroll through Morrill Plaza and reflect on what that name and this campus can teach the nation about what government can and cannot do.”

Congress passed the Morrill Act in 1862, says Will, “giving birth to what would become Michigan State University, which became the prototype of the land grant colleges and the American system of great research universities which today are the envy of the world.” Read more »

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

December 7th, 2014

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 53:30 min – 30 mb mp3

“Moving is not a very sexy job, but our company values really started by just wanting to get the job done for people,” Two Men and a Truck CEO Brig Sorber tells Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis and Russ White. “We just like to please people, and we’ve built on that.” The company is committed to making the communities in which they operate better by giving back, adds Sorber.

“When you give something and put yourself second, good things happen. We want our franchisees to get involved in their communities. If we’re going to make a living out of a community, it’s much better if we make a living out of a stronger community. We’ve always been blessed following that path.”

When it comes to food, the holidays are usually all about tradition. Michigan State University’s award-winning corporate top chef, Kurt Kwiatkowski, outlines the evolution of food on campus and some of the best ways to enjoy holiday favorites with a twist.

As one of the top Christmas tree producing states in the country, the Christmas tree industry is a vital part of Michigan’s thriving and improving economy, especially during the holidays.

Bert Cregg, Christmas tree expert and associate professor within Michigan State University’s Departments of Horticulture and Forestry, tells Greening of the Great Lakes host, Kirk Heinze, about changing consumer demands and proper tree care.

RDJMsp.jpg Hear the Show 29:31 min – 16.8 mb mp3

“There’s no question we’re at a volatile time in college athletics, yet it’s a very encouraging time as well,” says Jim Pignataro, associate athletic director for student services and director of student-athlete support services. “I think it’s important that we recognize that we’re here to serve the mission of the institution – and that’s really for these student-athletes to earn a world-class education.”

“I believe the students who choose to come to Michigan State University come together and do amazing things,” adds Denise Maybank, MSU’s vice president for student affairs and services. “And they come with the understanding that they’re going to be part of a broad cross section of individuals and they get to learn new things from each other.

“Students learn that different isn’t necessarily bad; it’s an opportunity for me to learn something. We have to cultivate an environment where that particular challenge is seen as one that is welcome.” Read more »

marrapp.jpg Hear the Show 22:34 min – 12.9 mb mp3

“We were founded in the 1960′s, and the whole premise was that medicine could be taught in the places where most people live, work and need medicine,” Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Dean Marsha Rappley tells Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis and Russ White. “It was about bringing a set of values around really strong communication and great relationship building with patients as a part of helping them to be well.

“Our mission expanded into research about those things, and now as we move forward into our next 50 years, it’s really about taking the whole land grant mission that has been the basis for Michigan State University since its founding and focusing that on the communities we serve.”

The College is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014.

Dean Rappley adds that “it’s not just that we go to Marquette, Traverse City, Midland, Flint, Grand Rapids and Lansing as places to educate our students. It’s our responsibility to make those better places because we are there to bring value to those communities that support us in very strong ways financially, but also with moral support. They help us create connections throughout the communities.” Read more »

brig.jpg Hear the Show 19:52 min – 11.3 mb mp3

“Moving is not a very sexy job, but our company values really started by just wanting to get the job done for people,” Two Men and a Truck CEO Brig Sorber tells Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis and Russ White. “We just like to please people, and we’ve built on that.”

Sorber says embracing technology is one of the strategies that allowed the company to grow during the recent recession. And he says the company has always looked at challenges as opportunities.

“I learned that it’s better to look in the mirror than out the window when things aren’t going well. Now as housing comes back, we have capacity issues. Can we meet the demand for our service? Now that we’ve grabbed more of that market share, we don’t want to upset customers by not having the capacity to take care of their needs.

“What you have to do in business, especially if you want to move ahead, is get out into the storm. A lot of our competition held back, but we took our boat out into those rough waters and that’s where market share is grabbed.”

The company is committed to making the communities in which they operate better by giving back, adds Sorber.

“When you give something and put yourself second, good things happen. We want our franchisees to get involved in their communities. If we’re going to make a living out of a community, it’s much better if we make a living out of a stronger community. We’ve always been blessed following that path.”

ChefKurt.JPG Hear the Show 13:47 min – 8 mb mp3

by Hannah Watts

When it comes to food, the holidays are usually all about tradition. Michigan State University’s award-winning corporate top chef, Kurt Kwiatkowski, outlines the evolution of food on campus and some of the best ways to enjoy holiday favorites with a twist.

Typically a holiday meal involves one main entree and few small sides, but Kwiatkowski is seeing an increase in the amount and array of hors devours and side dishes.

“You don’t always have to cook a whole turkey or a whole ham,” he says. “You can just do the turkey breast, scale down the portions and try new spices. I think you’re making your food more exciting and more fun that way.”

With recipes dominated by glazes, sauces, sugars and syrups it can be difficult to eat healthy during the holiday season. For those looking to maintain balance in their holiday meals, Kwiatkowski emphasizes alternative cooking methods, vegetable-based side dishes and hors devours.

“You could oven roast your sweet potatoes and add brussel sprouts as a side,” he says. “Hors devours could be something as simple as shrimp cocktail or a dip. It doesn’t have to be a big bite.”

Offering hors devours before a meal can also help prevent overeating and promote portion control.

“Sometimes it’s the build up,” he says. “People come over and you’re waiting around to eat and you’re holding off. Then when it’s time to eat you have a little too much. A few little snacks ahead of time can help satiate that.” Read more »

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

November 6th, 2014

eesppic.jpg Hear the Show 53:30 min – 30 mb mp3

Spartans head basketball coach Tom Izzo tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis that he considers himself to be an educator as much as a coach.

“Ninety percent of the kids you coach graduate and never play another day of basketball,” says Izzo. “The process I try to stick with is to make them all better players, people and students.”

Izzo adds that he’s seen his 2014/2015 Spartans picked anywhere from second to eighth in the Big Ten and between ninth and thirtieth in the country and that he agrees with those assessments.

“We’re a Top 20 team with a lot to prove.” Read more »

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