spartanpodcast.com

Howes142.jpg Hear the Conversation 30:21 – 17.3 mb mp3

Detroit News columnist and associate business editor Daniel Howes joins Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for a wide-ranging conversation on the state of American education, our country’s political system, and the future of Detroit.

Howes is a fan of a traditional liberal arts education and believes that too much of a focus on preparing for a career often leaves the United States with “more people who have degrees, but who are less educated. A more broad-based approach to education serves more people and is better than a narrow approach. Education is more than just a transaction and a means to an end.”

“In order to have productive members of society in a democratic country such as our own requires its citizens to have a certain kind of broad-based education.” Read more »

making radio.JPG Hear the Conversation 15:54 – 9.1 mb mp3

“The culture of the MSU Alumni Association has evolved from one of owing it to your university to join because of all it did for you to a culture of Spartans helping Spartans where we strive to find and connect Spartans to each other and to their communities so we can make the world a better place,” MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis.

MSUAA’s LENS program, says Westerman, “is lifelong enrichment for Spartans. We’ve moved away from career counseling to life empowerment where we hope to equip alumni with the skills for sustainable success.”

Westerman says his next big goal is to “drive the alumni presence into the student experience.” He has changed the name and focus of the Student Alumni Foundation to the Association of Future Alumni.

“We seek to identify the men and women of vision who are going to become the next generation of significant donors who will fund our margin of excellence for the next generation.” Read more »

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“One of the things I appreciate the most about Michigan State University is the low barriers to collaboration with other units on campus,” says Vennie Gore in a conversation with MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon and Bill Beekman. Gore is vice president for auxiliary enterprises at MSU. Gore and his RHS colleagues work with academic and service units on campus to provide the best student experience.

Gore continues to lead the development of MSU’s Neighborhood concept. “They’re partly about geographic locations, but they’re also about providing a diversity of academic and demographic experiences for students,” says Gore.

Gore says his unit serves 45,000 meals a day and procures $30 million worth of food each year. He says another important purpose of the neighborhoods is to provide a “sense of third place” where the entire community can come together.

“The neighborhoods aren’t just about the people who live there, but are about the entire community.”

Spartan Volleyball‘s two-time defending Big Ten volleyball Defensive Player of the Year Kori Moster and her charismatic coach Cathy George talk with Simon and Beekman, too.

The wide-ranging conversation touches on President Simon’s view of the “value of sport” and how athletic participation is really a four-year internship for student-athletes. While Big Ten athletes are busy and often don’t have the time to devote to traditional internships or study abroad experiences, employers do like the skills the student-athletes are honing while competing.

sue c 14.jpg Hear the Conversation 18:58 – 10.8 mb mp3

Longtime MSU journalism professor Sue Carter is MSU’s new faculty representative to the Big Ten and NCAA.

“In governance situations, there are three principle groups who have a voice – the presidents and chancellors, the athletic directors, and the faculty athletic representatives,” says Carter. “Members of these groups are critical in helping set term and tone for what happens in college athletics.

“I represent MSU on various committees and councils dealing with things like budgets and student-athlete health. And I report back to and engage with the rest of the faculty.”

As for teaching tomorrow’s journalists:

“There are three aspects to journalism,” Carter says she tells parents and others who ask her whether journalism is dead. “One is to gather the information, and the second is to process or edit the information, and the third is to distribute it.

“The first two remain constant. We use different tools. We need to be more thoughtful about how we monetize it.”

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon, Carter and MSU Secretary to the Board of Trustees Bill Beekman also talk a lot about sports on television and the programming philosophy of the Big Ten Network.

vg14.jpg Hear the Conversation 22:12 – 12.7 mb mp3

“One of the things I appreciate the most about Michigan State University is the low barriers to collaboration with other units on campus,” says Vennie Gore in a conversation with MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon and Bill Beekman. Gore is vice president for auxiliary enterprises at MSU. Gore and his RHS colleagues work with academic and service units on campus to provide the best student experience.

Gore continues to lead the development of MSU’s Neighborhood concept. “They’re partly about geographic locations, but they’re also about providing a diversity of academic and demographic experiences for students,” says Gore.

“One of the major changes we’ve made over the last seven years is that we’ve gone from a production format of food service to a much more cook to flow process with chefs. So many of our chefs are able to customize diets for students with special dietary needs.”

Gore says his unit serves 45,000 meals a day and procures $30 million worth of food each year. He says another important purpose of the neighborhoods is to provide a “sense of third place” where the entire community can come together.

“The neighborhoods aren’t just about the people who live there, but are about the entire community.”

Gore’s best advice for parents as their children transition to college?

“Kids need us to listen. We baby boomer parents have tended to be very active in our kids life all along, and it’s hard to let that go. College is about learning to make decisions for oneself and becoming independent. So parents need to resist fixing everything in their child’s life that will come up during their college years.”

As for the students? “Don’t bring everything.”

Another trend Gore says is on the horizon is the availability of more specialty foods at venues like Spartan Stadium and Breslin Center.

korisp.jpg Hear the Conversation 21:45 – 12.4 mb mp3

Spartan Volleyball‘s two-time defending Big Ten volleyball Defensive Player of the Year Kori Moster and her charismatic coach Cathy George talk with Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Vice President and Secretary of the Board of Trustees Bill Beekman.

Moster is recently back from a 10-day trip to China as part of USA Volleyball, the collegiate national team.

“The experience was better than anything I was expecting,” Moster says. “I needed that that China/international experience of how the game changes on the international stage.”

Defense in volleyball, say Moster and George, is “the heart of the game.” The 5′ 4″ Moster says “you don’t have to be the tallest kid in the world, you have to have the heart and the will to work for something.” Read more »

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“Hopefully this is part of a continuing trend to bring us back to a top ten state,” says Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon regarding the Fiscal Year 2015 budget for the state’s public universities that provides a 5.9% increase for Michigan’s 15 public universities. “We can’t get complacent, though. We need to continue to work harder and harder to make sure we’re preparing students anyone in the world would want, but who just want to stay here.”

President Simon says she and Team MSU are continuing to think about “what’s going to be the new normal for higher education.” And she says there’s a lot of “imagineering” that goes on over the summer at MSU “about what this place should look like 5, 10, 15, or 20 years from now. We need to begin to plant those seeds now in the same way the first light of the Cyclotron was really planted 50 years ago.”

Spartans women’s basketball coach Suzy Merchant joins President Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for her annual visit to MSU Today.

The summer is time for Merchant to reflect on the season and where she wants to take her program, she says. She reaches out to converse and brainstorm with her fellow Spartan coaches across the entire Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and with coaches around the country with whom she enjoys close relationships. And she can spend more time with her players in the spring and summer.

MSU journalism senior Gabriela Saldivia reports on the MSU Community Music School‘s 12th annual Eric RicStar Winter Music Therapy Camp for individuals of all ages with special needs.

rmwlaks.jpg Hear the Conversation 20:18 – 9.3 mb mp3

“Hopefully this is part of a continuing trend to bring us back to a top ten state,” says Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon regarding the Fiscal Year 2015 budget for the state’s public universities that provides a 5.9% increase for Michigan’s 15 public universities. “We can’t get complacent, though. We need to continue to work harder and harder to make sure we’re preparing students anyone in the world would want, but who just want to stay here.”

“Talent,” is what President Simon says was the resounding theme at this year’s Mackinac Policy Conference. “How do we not only deal with the gap in people in certain job sets now, but how do we also look to the future to educate and think about opportunities for things that have not yet been created?”

On the URC’s report on Michigan’s Blue Economy, President Simon says she was most surprised by the finding in the report that the URC’s sponsored research portfolio in water is about the same size as its portfolio in automotive.

“It’s not simply that we’re surrounded by water and a great place for tourists to visit. Water can be an enormous asset for Michigan moving forward, particularly if we worry about protecting it and preserving it not just for today but for tomorrow.” Read more »

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“Pursuing a degree in higher education is about the whole person,” Phil Gardner tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “MSU’s mission statement is not to get people employed; it’s to put students in a position to achieve their lifelong aspirations.”

Gardner leads the Collegiate Employment Research Institute and Career Services at MSU.

Gardner says more employers are seeking what are known as T-shaped professionals.

“The World Cup is on par with the Olympics as the most popular and watched sporting event in the world; sometimes as Americans we lose sight of that,” Spartans women’s soccer coach Tom Saxton tells Simon and Hollis. “We try to impress upon our student-athletes that modeling is a powerful form of learning. So when they can watch the best in the world play for their country, it’s a cool thing.”

For Americans who don’t pay close attention to soccer, Spartans men’s soccer coach Damon Rensing says there is still a lot of action in games that don’t feature much scoring. Soccer players will run anywhere from 5 to 9 miles during a game.

MSU senior Gabriela Saldivia introduces you to the pasteurized pig project at the MSU Student Organic Farm, and Scott Westerman shares his Career Quick Reference.

soccersp.jpg Hear the Conversation 15:55 – 9.1 mb mp3

“The World Cup is on par with the Olympics as the most popular and watched sporting event in the world; sometimes as Americans we lose sight of that,” Spartans women’s soccer coach Tom Saxton tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “We try to impress upon our student-athletes that modeling is a powerful form of learning. So when they can watch the best in the world play for their country, it’s a cool thing.”

For Americans who don’t pay close attention to soccer, Spartans men’s soccer coach Damon Rensing says there is still a lot of action in games that don’t feature much scoring. Soccer players will run anywhere from 5 to 9 miles during a game.

Saxton says there’s an increased awareness on the concussion risk in the sport of soccer. He says the research is inconclusive on the impact of heading the ball on head injuries but that everyone in the sport is watching the situation closely.

For parents with budding young soccer players, Rensing advises they make sure their son or daughter really has a true love and passion for the game.

“And spend a ton of time with the ball. Sometimes we get caught up with how fast or strong we are. What’s beautiful about soccer is a player doesn’t have to be 6′ 3.” It helps to be fast, but if you’re really good with the ball and make good decisions, you can excel.”

Saxton adds that specialization by athletes at too young an age is not good, particularly for female athletes. “I encourage young players to play a lot of different sports because your nervous system gets used to more ranges of motion.

Early specialization seems to lead to a greater risk of ACL injuries, which are on the rise for female athletes, he adds. “One out of ten female college athletes tears her ACL. So anything we can do to make that go down would be really good.”

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