spartanpodcast.com

korisp.jpg Hear the Conversation 21:45 – 12.4 mb mp3

Spartan Volleyball‘s two-time defending Big Ten volleyball Defensive Player of the Year Kori Moster and her charismatic coach Cathy George talk with Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Vice President and Secretary of the Board of Trustees Bill Beekman.

Moster is recently back from a 10-day trip to China as part of USA Volleyball, the collegiate national team.

“The experience was better than anything I was expecting,” Moster says. “I needed that that China/international experience of how the game changes on the international stage.”

Defense in volleyball, say Moster and George, is “the heart of the game.” The 5′ 4″ Moster says “you don’t have to be the tallest kid in the world, you have to have the heart and the will to work for something.” Read more »

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“Hopefully this is part of a continuing trend to bring us back to a top ten state,” says Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon regarding the Fiscal Year 2015 budget for the state’s public universities that provides a 5.9% increase for Michigan’s 15 public universities. “We can’t get complacent, though. We need to continue to work harder and harder to make sure we’re preparing students anyone in the world would want, but who just want to stay here.”

President Simon says she and Team MSU are continuing to think about “what’s going to be the new normal for higher education.” And she says there’s a lot of “imagineering” that goes on over the summer at MSU “about what this place should look like 5, 10, 15, or 20 years from now. We need to begin to plant those seeds now in the same way the first light of the Cyclotron was really planted 50 years ago.”

Spartans women’s basketball coach Suzy Merchant joins President Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for her annual visit to MSU Today.

The summer is time for Merchant to reflect on the season and where she wants to take her program, she says. She reaches out to converse and brainstorm with her fellow Spartan coaches across the entire Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and with coaches around the country with whom she enjoys close relationships. And she can spend more time with her players in the spring and summer.

MSU journalism senior Gabriela Saldivia reports on the MSU Community Music School‘s 12th annual Eric RicStar Winter Music Therapy Camp for individuals of all ages with special needs.

rmwlaks.jpg Hear the Conversation 20:18 – 9.3 mb mp3

“Hopefully this is part of a continuing trend to bring us back to a top ten state,” says Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon regarding the Fiscal Year 2015 budget for the state’s public universities that provides a 5.9% increase for Michigan’s 15 public universities. “We can’t get complacent, though. We need to continue to work harder and harder to make sure we’re preparing students anyone in the world would want, but who just want to stay here.”

“Talent,” is what President Simon says was the resounding theme at this year’s Mackinac Policy Conference. “How do we not only deal with the gap in people in certain job sets now, but how do we also look to the future to educate and think about opportunities for things that have not yet been created?”

On the URC’s report on Michigan’s Blue Economy, President Simon says she was most surprised by the finding in the report that the URC’s sponsored research portfolio in water is about the same size as its portfolio in automotive.

“It’s not simply that we’re surrounded by water and a great place for tourists to visit. Water can be an enormous asset for Michigan moving forward, particularly if we worry about protecting it and preserving it not just for today but for tomorrow.” Read more »

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“Pursuing a degree in higher education is about the whole person,” Phil Gardner tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “MSU’s mission statement is not to get people employed; it’s to put students in a position to achieve their lifelong aspirations.”

Gardner leads the Collegiate Employment Research Institute and Career Services at MSU.

Gardner says more employers are seeking what are known as T-shaped professionals.

“The World Cup is on par with the Olympics as the most popular and watched sporting event in the world; sometimes as Americans we lose sight of that,” Spartans women’s soccer coach Tom Saxton tells Simon and Hollis. “We try to impress upon our student-athletes that modeling is a powerful form of learning. So when they can watch the best in the world play for their country, it’s a cool thing.”

For Americans who don’t pay close attention to soccer, Spartans men’s soccer coach Damon Rensing says there is still a lot of action in games that don’t feature much scoring. Soccer players will run anywhere from 5 to 9 miles during a game.

MSU senior Gabriela Saldivia introduces you to the pasteurized pig project at the MSU Student Organic Farm, and Scott Westerman shares his Career Quick Reference.

soccersp.jpg Hear the Conversation 15:55 – 9.1 mb mp3

“The World Cup is on par with the Olympics as the most popular and watched sporting event in the world; sometimes as Americans we lose sight of that,” Spartans women’s soccer coach Tom Saxton tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “We try to impress upon our student-athletes that modeling is a powerful form of learning. So when they can watch the best in the world play for their country, it’s a cool thing.”

For Americans who don’t pay close attention to soccer, Spartans men’s soccer coach Damon Rensing says there is still a lot of action in games that don’t feature much scoring. Soccer players will run anywhere from 5 to 9 miles during a game.

Saxton says there’s an increased awareness on the concussion risk in the sport of soccer. He says the research is inconclusive on the impact of heading the ball on head injuries but that everyone in the sport is watching the situation closely.

For parents with budding young soccer players, Rensing advises they make sure their son or daughter really has a true love and passion for the game.

“And spend a ton of time with the ball. Sometimes we get caught up with how fast or strong we are. What’s beautiful about soccer is a player doesn’t have to be 6′ 3.” It helps to be fast, but if you’re really good with the ball and make good decisions, you can excel.”

Saxton adds that specialization by athletes at too young an age is not good, particularly for female athletes. “I encourage young players to play a lot of different sports because your nervous system gets used to more ranges of motion.

Early specialization seems to lead to a greater risk of ACL injuries, which are on the rise for female athletes, he adds. “One out of ten female college athletes tears her ACL. So anything we can do to make that go down would be really good.”

Suzy14sp.jpg Hear the Conversation 17:14 – 9.9 mb mp3

Spartans women’s basketball coach Suzy Merchant joins Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for her annual visit to MSU Today.

The summer is time for Merchant to reflect on the season and where she wants to take her program, she says. She reaches out to converse and brainstorm with her fellow Spartan coaches across the entire Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and with coaches around the country with whom she enjoys close relationships. And she can spend more time with her players in the spring and summer.

“The time I get with my players is what I value most and what got me into coaching in the first place,” Merchant says. “It’s nice to have extra time with them that doesn’t involve basketball to enhance our relationships.

“As a coach I have to figure out what makes my players tick and what language they speak and then push the right buttons to make them click together in order for us to succeed.”

Merchant says she spends a lot of time coaching “neck up” and that “a lot of kids come in here with the skills and the talent, but they don’t really have the mental toughness to be a winner at this level. It’s fun to watch kids go through that struggle because it’s always worth it in the end.

“They don’t know what they don’t know when they get here. They think they do and then they get through the season and say ‘wow, that was intense.’ Then to see them fight through it and lead us to a Big Ten championship is special.”

PhilGsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 19:07 – 10.9 mb mp3

“Pursuing a degree in higher education is about the whole person,” Phil Gardner tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “MSU’s mission statement is not to get people employed; it’s to put students in a position to achieve their lifelong aspirations.”

Gardner leads the Collegiate Employment Research Institute and Career Services at MSU.

Gardner says more employers are seeking what are known as T-shaped professionals.

“It’s about gaining mastery of a discipline but understanding the context for a problem where your skills can be used,” he says. “You have to be in touch with your values and how you relate to others.”

Gardner’s advice for parents is to give their students “a license to get engaged in multiple ways to reaffirm or find what they really want to do. And then make sure they’re working toward those goals from day one and not waiting until the end of their academic careers.”

JLsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 23:30 – 10.7 mb mp3

“I try to talk about things that are of the most interest to the most people possible that are both interesting and significant,” says Michigan Radio‘s Jack Lessenberry. “And I try to give people a range of topics and surprise them once in awhile.

“When you do that five days a week, it’s a challenge. The blessing is our state is making so much news that I seldom run out of topics.”

Some of those topics discussed here:

Minimum wage: “It’s only fair that people in America earn a living wage and are able to afford the necessities of life. It’s a complex issue in Michigan.”

Detroit: “The issue to me is what happens once the bankruptcy issues are resolved, probably this fall. How does Detroit stay solvent let alone prosper? Detroit will still be a very poor city with a lot of people who aren’t very employable. How does Detroit get back on its feet?”

Michigan roads
: “In many polls 85% of Michigan residents say they’d be willing to pay more taxes to fix the roads. Something has to happen or there may be a citizen revolt.”

Gridlocked legislature: “It’s worse than ever for two reasons: gerrymandered districts that lead to no desire to compromise and term limits, which is the single worst thing to happen in the history of the universe with the possible exception of athlete’s foot.”

Michigan State University: “MSU was invented to help the people of the state of Michigan, and it’s also an intellectual powerhouse. It many ways, it’s the university of Michigan serving all of Michigan, and that’s a model that more of us at a lot of levels should adopt.”

Journalism: “It’s not clear what the future of journalism will really look like yet. At some point we’ll have to arrive at a news model that works economically. We have access to more information, but less of it is relevant. For my students (Jack teaches journalism at Wayne State University), they need a package of skills that they’ll need to be able to use in a variety of settings. Kids today get out of school and have to create a job, not find one, Tom Friedman once told me.”

helmet.jpg Hear the Conversation 4:26 – 2.5 mb mp3

Building Winning Teams is an executive development program designed to help managers rise to the managerial challenges and opportunities they’ll likely confront in their careers by building sustainable skills in the area of leadership and team effectiveness.

It’s a collaboration between the management faculty in the Broad College of Business and the coaching staff of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics at Michigan State University. It’s June third through the fifth at MSU’s Henry Center for Executive Development.

“The professors bring a real-world sense of things, and we get to interact with the MSU coaches in a casual setting and see how they incorporate leadership and teamwork on their teams,” says Tim Bograkos, who attended the inaugural program last year.

“One of the things we sell to recruits is the uniqueness of Team MSU and the connection on campus,” says MSU women’s basketball coach Suzy Merchant. “Work ethic, character, and passion are the three pillars on which I’ve built my program, and I think they transfer well to the business world.”

“I hope to leave them with new ideas and different ways to think about building their successful teams,” says MSU women’s golf coach Stacy Slobodnik-Stoll. “I hope they leave with new and unique, exciting ideas that they can bring back to their companies to kick start some great ideas.”

attable.JPG Hear the Conversation 45:45 – 26.1 mb mp3

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis reflect on the end of the academic year at MSU. Topics include the state of college athletics, construction updates for the north end zone project and FRIB, tuition and the value of a MSU degree, and President Simon explains what she means by Rose Bowl moments.

Hollis likes the link the north end zone expansion provides to north campus, and Simon says FRIB will be the best facility in the world that researches rare isotopes.

“Mark and I are both committed to the essence of the collegiate model for student athletes,” says Simon on the topic of the changing profile of the modern student-athlete.

And Hollis believes “we need to continue to define what the role of intercollegiate athletics is supposed to be, and from my perspective there are two priorities.

“One is to provide opportunities for young men and women to compete in their sport and use it as a way to earn a valuable education that pays dividends to them for their entire lives. The other is to bring people back to Michigan State University and connect them back to the university in a positive way.”

On the coming 4-team college football playoff in 2014 Hollis says there’s still a lot of uncertainty with exactly how the whole process is going to work.

And on tuition President Simon says MSU will continue to worry about cost and how the university spends money on a variety of services, “but we also have to worry about the value of the education our students are receiving. And it’s really the value that determines whether a price point was reasonable.

“We need to make sure we keep the students first and keep reinventing ourselves within the same value structure in order to provide high-impact learning experiences.”

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