spartanpodcast.com

marrapp.jpg Hear the Show 22:34 min – 12.9 mb mp3

“We were founded in the 1960′s, and the whole premise was that medicine could be taught in the places where most people live, work and need medicine,” Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Dean Marsha Rappley tells Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis and Russ White. “It was about bringing a set of values around really strong communication and great relationship building with patients as a part of helping them to be well.

“Our mission expanded into research about those things, and now as we move forward into our next 50 years, it’s really about taking the whole land grant mission that has been the basis for Michigan State University since its founding and focusing that on the communities we serve.”

The College is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014.

Dean Rappley adds that “it’s not just that we go to Marquette, Traverse City, Midland, Flint, Grand Rapids and Lansing as places to educate our students. It’s our responsibility to make those better places because we are there to bring value to those communities that support us in very strong ways financially, but also with moral support. They help us create connections throughout the communities.” Read more »

brig.jpg Hear the Show 19:52 min – 11.3 mb mp3

“Moving is not a very sexy job, but our company values really started by just wanting to get the job done for people,” Two Men and a Truck CEO Brig Sorber tells Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis and Russ White. “We just like to please people, and we’ve built on that.”

Sorber says embracing technology is one of the strategies that allowed the company to grow during the recent recession. And he says the company has always looked at challenges as opportunities.

“I learned that it’s better to look in the mirror than out the window when things aren’t going well. Now as housing comes back, we have capacity issues. Can we meet the demand for our service? Now that we’ve grabbed more of that market share, we don’t want to upset customers by not having the capacity to take care of their needs.

“What you have to do in business, especially if you want to move ahead, is get out into the storm. A lot of our competition held back, but we took our boat out into those rough waters and that’s where market share is grabbed.”

The company is committed to making the communities in which they operate better by giving back, adds Sorber.

“When you give something and put yourself second, good things happen. We want our franchisees to get involved in their communities. If we’re going to make a living out of a community, it’s much better if we make a living out of a stronger community. We’ve always been blessed following that path.”

ChefKurt.JPG Hear the Show 13:47 min – 8 mb mp3

by Hannah Watts

When it comes to food, the holidays are usually all about tradition. Michigan State University’s award-winning corporate top chef, Kurt Kwiatkowski, outlines the evolution of food on campus and some of the best ways to enjoy holiday favorites with a twist.

Typically a holiday meal involves one main entree and few small sides, but Kwiatkowski is seeing an increase in the amount and array of hors devours and side dishes.

“You don’t always have to cook a whole turkey or a whole ham,” he says. “You can just do the turkey breast, scale down the portions and try new spices. I think you’re making your food more exciting and more fun that way.”

With recipes dominated by glazes, sauces, sugars and syrups it can be difficult to eat healthy during the holiday season. For those looking to maintain balance in their holiday meals, Kwiatkowski emphasizes alternative cooking methods, vegetable-based side dishes and hors devours.

“You could oven roast your sweet potatoes and add brussel sprouts as a side,” he says. “Hors devours could be something as simple as shrimp cocktail or a dip. It doesn’t have to be a big bite.”

Offering hors devours before a meal can also help prevent overeating and promote portion control.

“Sometimes it’s the build up,” he says. “People come over and you’re waiting around to eat and you’re holding off. Then when it’s time to eat you have a little too much. A few little snacks ahead of time can help satiate that.” Read more »

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

November 6th, 2014

eesppic.jpg Hear the Show 53:30 min – 30 mb mp3

Spartans head basketball coach Tom Izzo tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis that he considers himself to be an educator as much as a coach.

“Ninety percent of the kids you coach graduate and never play another day of basketball,” says Izzo. “The process I try to stick with is to make them all better players, people and students.”

Izzo adds that he’s seen his 2014/2015 Spartans picked anywhere from second to eighth in the Big Ten and between ninth and thirtieth in the country and that he agrees with those assessments.

“We’re a Top 20 team with a lot to prove.” Read more »

CB.JPG Hear the Conversation 6:34 – 3.8 mb mp3

“The first thing I did when I got to MSU is get to know the culture here and then look for individuals who fit that culture for our football program,” Spartan Football‘s director of college advancement and performance Curtis Blackwell tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis.

“I’m here to help with recruiting because the process has been accelerated over the years. We like to take the time to get to know our prospects and get them on campus to see whether they’re a good fit for our program.

“The camaraderie and chemistry at MSU is unique. Players either feel that or they don’t when they get here, and we’re fine with that. As Coach Dantonio always says, being a Spartan is a relationship for a lifetime and the players’ time at MSU is the launching of their career.”

And Blackwell thanks Simon and Hollis for having the vision to create his position and says that confidence in him “is a sign of where Michigan State is headed.”

tom-izzo.jpg Hear the Conversation 21:09 – 12.1 mb mp3

Spartans head basketball coach Tom Izzo tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis that he considers himself to be an educator as much as a coach.

“Ninety percent of the kids you coach graduate and never play another day of basketball,” says Izzo. “The process I try to stick with is to make them all better players, people and students.”

“We’re young with 6 or 7 new guys, which is unusual for us, but I love our passion and the emerging leadership of Valentine, Trice and Dawson,” says Izzo. “Last year we had good chemistry, but no leaders. This year we have two great leaders in Valentine and Trice and Dawson is starting to move his game up.

“We have passion, chemistry and leadership, so if anyone can coach this team we’ll be decent,” quips Izzo.

Izzo says he’s seen his Spartans picked anywhere from second to eighth in the Big Ten and between ninth and thirtieth in the country and that he agrees with those assessments.

“We’re a Top 20 team with a lot to prove.”

eephoto.jpg Hear the Conversation 16:01 – 9.2 mb mp3

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis welcome campaign co-chairs Dee Cook and Bob Skandalaris to the MSU Today microphones for a conversation on Empower Extraordinary: The Campaign for Michigan State University.

Cook is a former MSU Trustee, and Skandalaris is founder and CEO of Quantum Ventures of Michigan LLC.

Michigan State University is poised to achieve the next milestone in fulfilling its legacy and achieving its destiny—to power and empower—through the campaign. More than ever, philanthropic investment through private giving from MSU alumni and friends is essential to maintaining the university’s standard of excellence and to reducing the tuition burden on students and their families. Read more »

bob mark2.jpg Hear the Conversation 9:10 – 3.2 mb mp3

“Years ago the state used to pay about 70 percent of the tuition, and now it’s down to about 17 percent,” Empower Extraordinary campaign co-chair Bob Skandalaris tells Steve Courtney on the October 25, WJR MSU Auto Owner’s Insurance Tailgate Show. “There’s a large gap that has to be covered by people outside the university.

The Michigan State University Board of Trustees on October 24 approved a $1.5 billion capital campaign intended to build on MSU’s traditions while empowering critical initiatives for the 21st century.

“I think it’s important for all of us to understand that we’ve had opportunities because of what was provided to us at Michigan State,” adds MSU Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “It takes a community to really embrace a university and do all that can be done in order to give future students the same level of opportunities to pursue the same dreams and have the results that so many other Spartans have had.”

steve tom2.jpg Hear the Conversation 8:36 – 3 mb mp3

“We’re young with 6 or 7 new guys, which is unusual for us, but I love our passion and the emerging leadership of Valentine, Trice and Dawson,” Spartans basketball coach Tom Izzo tells Steve Courtney on the October 25 WJR MSU Auto Owner’s Insurance Tailgate Show. “Last year we had good chemistry, but no leaders. This year we have two great leaders in Valentine and Trice and Dawson is starting to move his game up.

“We have passion, chemistry and leadership, so if anyone can coach this team we’ll be decent,” quips Izzo.

Izzo says he’s seen his Spartans picked anywhere from second to eighth in the Big Ten and between ninth and thirtieth in the country and that he agrees with those assessments.

“We’re a Top 20 team with a lot to prove.”

newLAKS.jpg Hear the Conversation 13:42 – 6.3 mb mp3

by Hannah Watts

Michigan State University has launched “Empower Extraordinary – The Campaign for Michigan State University” fundraising effort, and MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon discusses the details with Russ White.

With an approved goal of more than $1.5 billion, the university is focused on making big leaps, says President Simon.

“The real purpose of the campaign is to make Michigan State University a better place,” Simon says. “A place that is returning on the investment people have made in it, whether a student, faculty member, alumni or Michigan resident.”

There are four central themes of the campaign: Engine of opportunity; Force for creativity, discovery and learning; Tackling global challenges; and Building a vibrant and dynamic community.

“It’s not about fixing roofs and filling in holes,” she says. “It’s about the big leaps that institutions must make to be world competitive. It’s about talent attraction and retention and having the dollars to offer fellowships and scholarships.” Read more »

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