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footballsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 17:38 – 10 mb mp3

“We’re at the point now where an eleven-win season isn’t good enough, and that’s awesome that Coach D has brought us to that point,” Spartans quarterback Connor Cook tells Michigan State University Provost June Pierce Youatt and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today.

“It was a great season; we made a lot of great memories and finished super strong in the Cotton Bowl.”

Cook’s teammate, defensive lineman Shilique Calhoun, adds that “We’re going to take strides to try to be better next year because we understand our talent level and what we need to do to be the best.”

Calhoun says he appreciates the discipline Coach D has instilled in him, and Cook says Dantonio has taught him the importance of surrounding oneself with the right people. Read more »

Prabusp.jpg Hear the Conversation 16:55 – 9.7 mb mp3

“The exciting stuff that’s happening (in the communications world) is also the challenge,” says Prabu David, new dean of the College of Communication Arts & Sciences at Michigan State University. David talks with MSU Provost June Pierce Youatt and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today.

“The excitement is about change. Every day something changes; we live in a very dynamic media environment. The challenge is keeping up with the change and knowing which one is a trend that’s going to persist and which one is just a blip on the radar.

“So we train our students to be digitally savvy; every student in the program should have core digital skills. At the same time they should also have the critical thinking skills to tell the difference between what is right and what is wrong and to make those important decisions that could have phenomenal impact.”

Dean David says today’s students need to be global, too, immerse themselves in experiential learning, and be entrepreneurial. And he emphasizes that “writing is so critical.”

David says MSU has one of the best colleges of communication arts and sciences; it has depth and breadth in both the arts and sciences. He wants even more of a seamless integration of the arts and sciences and more interdisciplinary connections on campus “to attack big social problems.”

PRsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 20 min – 11.4 mb mp3

“There’s a difference in the needs of media when you look at athletic and sports media versus mainstream or straight news,” Kent Cassella tells Michigan State University Provost June Pierce Youatt and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today.

“Strategies to serve both are mostly about reputation management – and sometimes we have to defend our reputation – and the other side of it is figuring out how to tell the hundreds of great stories we have to tell in the most effective way.”

Cassella is MSU’s associate vice president for communications and senior public relations strategist.

John Lewandowski is Spartan Athletics‘ associate athletic director for communications. He says one of his challenges in the modern media world is making student-athletes aware that they’re public figures who need to realize the level of exposure they have as Spartan athletes. Read more »

Shelley2DWsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 28:16 min – 16.1 mb mp3

“When you think about the privilege of being part of Michigan State and Spartan Athletics, you walk with people who are amazing and do incredible things,” says Spartans’ associate athletic director Shelley Appelbaum to Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman.

Helping all student-athletes reach their potential is Appelbaum’s top goal. She says Spartan Athletics is filled with people who feel “gratitude and not entitlement” to be part of Team MSU.

When Appelbaum and her colleagues around the country look to the future of intercollegiate athletics, “We want to make sure that student-athletes are still having fun and that ultimately we’re not overtraining and overworking them. We work hard at MSU to create a balance. It’s all about the balance of recruitment, retention, graduation and placement.

“There’s a pathway to success, and graduation is the goal here. It’s not a wish or a hope or a prayer, it’s the plan.” Read more »

PGR14.jpg Hear the Conversation 9:13 – 4.2 mb mp3

Michigan State University will celebrate Martin Luther King Day 2015 by paying tribute to its Project 60/50 “Crossing Borders, Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges.”

“We wanted to educate and engage the community, and we think we’ve done that,” says MSU Office of Inclusion leader Paulette Granberry Russell. “Racial inequality still persists in our country. We have to create space for people to talk about these issues in a respectful and civil way. We need more dialogue and conversation. We have no political agenda.

“The goal now is to sustain the work in a meaningful way that allows the legacy of 60/50 and the safe space it created for dialogue.”

The tribute and celebration will include a Saturday gala that “celebrates a year’s worth of effort;” free Sunday jazz concerts that are “our gift to the community;” a Monday luncheon in partnership with the Greater Lansing King Commemorative Celebration Commission; a student leadership conference begins Monday morning; a commemorative march from the Union to Beaumont Tower; an exhibit at the MSU Museum; and a Union Activities Board event after Saturday gala on spoken word where you’ll see “the talent of our students and the commitment around these issues” reflected.

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

January 1st, 2015

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 53:30 min – 30 mb mp3

“Research reveals that when young people study the arts, they show heightened academic standing, a strong capacity for self-assessment, and a secure sense of their own ability to plan and work for a positive future,” MSU College of Music dean Jim Forger tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman. “Music and the arts are great for their own intrinsic value, but they teach many lessons: they instill discipline, and they build self-esteem and character.”

“The Media Sandbox is a program of integrated media arts,” MSU Media Sandbox director David Wheeler tells Simon and Westerman. “We live in the College of Communication Arts & Sciences and span the three departments of journalism, advertising and media and information, which for us, included cinematic arts and game design.”

What makes the program unique, says Wheeler, is that “it’s not just media, and it’s not just technology. Technology changes, but content remains somewhat the same – about telling a story.”

DWsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 25:31 min – 14.6 mb mp3

“The Media Sandbox is a program of integrated media arts,” MSU Media Sandbox director David Wheeler tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman. “We live in the College of Communication Arts & Sciences and span the three departments of journalism, advertising and media and information, which for us, included cinematic arts and game design.”

What makes the program unique, says Wheeler, is that “it’s not just media, and it’s not just technology. Technology changes, but content remains somewhat the same – about telling a story.”

Students who leave the program produce content that helps feed the mainstream entertainment machine, but entrepreneurship and collaboration are key components of the program. Read more »

College of Music Dean Jim Forger

December 29th, 2014

JFsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 30:50 min – 17.6 mb mp3

“Research reveals that when young people study the arts, they show heightened academic standing, a strong capacity for self-assessment, and a secure sense of their own ability to plan and work for a positive future,” MSU College of Music dean Jim Forger tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman. “Music and the arts are great for their own intrinsic value, but they teach many lessons: they instill discipline, and they build self-esteem and character.”

Topics discussed include the development of the MSU Community Music School in both East Lansing and Detroit, and the Running Start program – a multi-disciplinary program that helps equip students for life as a working musician in the 21st century. Running Start prepares students to creatively channel their passions into vibrant careers. Read more »

Cotton.jpg Hear the Conversation 16:17 min – 9.3 mb mp3

Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis met with the media on December 16 and said he thinks it’s too early – before the first season of it is even complete – to decide whether the current four-team college football playoff is the sport’s best option for determining a champion.

“A lot of thought among AD’s and presidents needs to go into what we want college football to look like in the future,” says Hollis. And he says there are three important variables to consider: the student-athlete perspective, the institutional perspective, and the public and media perspective.

“There are a lot of great football teams out there in the country right now who feel like they’ve had a failed or a down season because they aren’t part of the four-team playoff. I’m not sure if the solution is to expand or reduce the field.” Read more »

prezphoto.jpg Hear the Conversation 22:17 min – 10.2 mb mp3

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon will serve as vice chairwoman of the Association of American Universities in the 2014-15 term, which will likely lead to her leading the prestigious group in 2015-16.

Founded in 1900 to advance the international standing of U.S. research universities, President Simon says the AAU today focuses on issues that are important to research-intensive universities like MSU, such as funding for research, research policy issues, and graduate and undergraduate education. AAU member universities are on the leading edge of innovation, scholarship, and solutions that contribute to the nation’s economy, security, and well-being.

George Will spoke at one of MSU’s December 2014 commencement ceremonies. His appearance at MSU stirred controversy due to comments he made in a column. Michael Moore addressed the graduates, too.

“Great universities are committed to serving the public good by creating space for discourse and exchange of ideas, though that exchange may be uncomfortable and will sometimes challenge values and beliefs,” says President Simon. “People can come to MSU and talk about their views, not because they’ve been labeled something, but because they have something to say.” Read more »

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