The Spartan Podcast

 

tourism16sp.jpg Hear the Conversation 18:15 – 10.4 mb mp3

Michigan’s tourism industry thrived in 2015 and is expected to remain strong through 2016, according to Michigan State University researchers Sarah Nicholls and Dan McCole.

2015 was highlighted by particularly strong growth in hotel occupancy rates, up 2.3 percent statewide compared to a national average 1.7 percent increase, and a significant surge in visitation to natural areas.

The researchers are forecasting that Michigan’s tourism industry will continue these positive trends in 2016, despite slightly weaker economic indicators compared to last year. McCole predicts a 3 percent increase in tourism prices and a 5 percent increase in tourism spending.

He adds that the preferences and status of millennials, the largest generation ever at more than 95 million strong, are significantly influencing travel trends as they age. Read more »

 

zikasp.jpg Hear the Conversation 10:25 – 6 mb mp3

“There are a lot of viruses transmitted by mosquitoes including some in Michigan that are what we call neuroinvasives like West Nile, which is in the same family as Zika,” Michigan State University associate professor of entomology Michael Kaufman tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes. “The key question on Zika is why the virus is particular in being able to invade the brain cells of developing infants.”

Kaufman says “the probability of anyone in Michigan picking up Zika from a mosquito is extremely low. We don’t have the species of mosquito that we know transmitted the virus in the tropics. It’s in the same probability range as being struck by lightning.” Read more »

 

world food prize.jpg Hear the Conversation 17:32 – 24 mb mp3

The World Food Prize Michigan Youth Institute brings together young people to discuss global food security and access, and explore possible career paths.

“I think it’s one of the most vital areas of study nowadays because we’re talking about in the next 20-35 years our global population growing to be nine to ten billion people,” Makena Schultz, youth leadership and civic engagement educator for Michigan State University Extension, tells Kraig Ehm on In the Field.

Raegan Gembarski, 2015 Michigan Global Youth Institute delegate was selected to attend the 2015 World Food Prize in Des Moines, Iowa.

“Being selected to go to Iowa, was a life-changing experience for me,” Gembarski explains. “Being a part of something bigger than myself. There were 300 of us kids, who all had the same goal, and it’s empowering when you’re in a room with 300 other youth, who want to change the world.”

This event gives young people an opportunity to explore their passion for helping others. “The World Food Prize Michigan Youth Institute offers a lens for young people to do that, so they can explore their passion, through the lens of global food security, which is really exciting. Young people have really innovative ideas, they’re very creative, they think outside the box, and very often they come up with great solutions to problems that maybe adults or other members of the community might not see so easily” Schultz said.

Makena and Raegan discuss pursuing a passion, leadership, and how Michigan’s youth can impact the world on In the Field, a podcast originating from the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State University.

 

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 52:54 min – 30.3 mb mp3

“It reaffirms what you’re trying to do,” Spartans football coach Mark Dantonio tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today in discussing his players and other Spartan athletes being recognized at MSU Athletics’ annual Academic Excellence Gala. “It can’t be all about football.

“When you look at the goals of our program, we have to win; I understand that. But part of this is about growth as people.”

Simon, Hollis and Dantonio talk about the value of study abroad to all MSU students, including student-athletes. And they discuss the concussion risk in college athletics. And Coach D talks about his team coming out of spring ball.

Internationally-renowned MSU water scientist Joan Rose tells Simon and Hollis that water quality is a complex, global issue. Read more »

 

gwynkraig.jpg Hear the Conversation 14:12 – 8.1 mb mp3

“I think growing up on a farm is just a fabulous way to grow up. Of course growing up on a farm you learn certain things, you learn about hard work and also the value of volunteering,” Gwyn Shelle, instructional technology specialist for the Michigan State University Extension, tells Kraig Ehm on In the Field.

Gwyn attended the CANR while a college student and received her Master’s degree in Agriculture and Extension Education. “4-H had always been a big part of my life. My thought was that I would possibly be a 4-H agent or somehow work within Extension,” Shelle explains.

For the past two years, Shelle has worked in Extension as an instructional technology specialist. “Sometimes people call me the Zoom expert, because Zoom is a tool we use to do video conferencing across the state and across the country. I may be the person people call with an idea for social media or adding active learning into their courses. Read more »

 

JRsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 25:37 – 14.6 mb mp3

Internationally-renowned MSU water scientist Joan Rose tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis that water quality is a complex, global issue.

“Water quality and its link to the biohealth of the planet is our biggest challenge, and it’s going to take us several decades to really get our arms around it,” says Rose.

Water knows no boundaries and is a global issue, according to Rose.

Rose is the 2016 recipient of the Stockholm Water Prize, announced in March at the United Nation’s World Water Day celebration in Geneva. The Stockholm Water Prize is the world’s most-prestigious water award. “The Nobel Prize of Water” Read more »

 

Brad Day SHsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 24:50 – 14.2 mb mp3

“I’ve had the opportunity to travel for Michigan State to Africa, South Asia and India. We’re everywhere,” Brad Day, associate professor and department chair for research in MSU’s Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today. “When you get off an airplane in India wearing an MSU logo, you’re a celebrity.”

Day and his team are unlocking the secrets of plants to understand how they fend off diseases, survive freezing temperatures or droughts, and they test them using state-of-the-art instrumentation, like MSU’s Growth Chamber Facility. It’s the largest of its kind at any university in the world, and it allows for the replication of the growing conditions and climate anywhere or anytime: past, present, or future. Read more »

 

MD16.jpg Hear the Conversation 25:34 – 14.6 mb mp3

“It reaffirms what you’re trying to do,” Spartans football coach Mark Dantonio tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today in discussing his players and other Spartan athletes being recognized at MSU Athletics’ annual Academic Excellence Gala. “It can’t be all about football.

“When you look at the goals of our program, we have to win; I understand that. But part of this is about growth as people.”

Simon, Hollis and Dantonio talk about the value of study abroad to all MSU students, including student-athletes.

“These are important life experiences because we want our students to have enough knowledge of the world to affect public policy in a positive way and to be leaders. So they have to have a variety of experiences, and some of them have risks to them,” says Simon. Read more »

 

EDsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 31:59 – 18.3 mb mp3

Forty six years ago on April 22, 1970 we celebrated the inaugural Earth Day. Over four decades later Earth Day is an international phenomenon, and global sustainability issues are constantly in the news.

Greening of the Great Lakes host Kirk Heinze convened a panel of environmental advocates to discuss the significance of Earth Day and key environmental issues.

Jack Schmitt is the deputy director of the Michigan League of Conservation Voters, James Clift is the policy director for the Michigan Environmental Council, and George Heartwell is the former three-term mayor of Grand Rapids. Read more »

 

Rose Heinze.jpg Hear the Conversation 15:48 – 9 mb mp3

“I’m so honored, and I think it represents a platform to start addressing water quality and health at the global level,” MSU Professor Joan Rose tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes. “I’m part of a global community that is so passionate about people’s health and how water quality affects that.”

Rose was the recipient in March of the world’s most prestigious water award, the Stockholm Water Prize. A global water science expert and Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research at Michigan State University, Rose is recognized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) for her research on microbial risk to human health in water, her successful translation of the science to policy makers, and for her leadership in developing the tools and guidelines required to give policy and regulatory life to the science.

The goal of the Global Water Pathogen Project, says Rose, is to make new information technology and knowledge more accessible for decision making. Read more »

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