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LAKS 414.jpg Hear the Conversation 17:03 – 7.8 mb mp3

“The NCAA as the symbol of amateur sports in America is undergoing a lot of change,” Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon tells Russ White on MSU Today. “Part of that is new leadership and part of it is the changes in the nature of Division 1 athletics and the revenue underpinning many programs.

“So the question is how to make the best possible decisions on behalf of student athletes. It’s a matter of each institution being sure that they agree that their role is to assure that students are getting the best quality education possible, because that’s something no one can take away from them.”

President Simon talks about T-shaped professionals and how MSU is preparing more of them for the modern workforce.

“It means that students need to have extraordinary depth in a particular area, but they also have to have a set of other skills that means they can use knowledge in a context that is workable and applicable to a variety of situations.” Read more »

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

After more than five years of design, the securing of funding and preliminary construction activities, work has officially begun on the civil construction for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

At a March 17 ceremony near the worksite on the Michigan State University campus, ground was broken for FRIB, a future national user facility supporting the mission of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy, designed to serve nuclear scientists from all over the world.

It’s also anticipated that FRIB will contribute nearly $1 billion in economic activity to the region. That includes construction, spinoff and annual DOE operational funding once FRIB begins operations.

We hear the groundbreaking ceremony on this evening’s show. Among those taking part in the March 17 celebration were U.S. Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow; U.S. Reps. Mike Rogers, David Camp and Tim Walberg and other members of the Michigan Congressional delegation; and Michael Knotek, deputy under secretary for science and energy, U.S. Department of Energy.

Also, Russ White talks with WJR’s Paul W. Smith.

grb.jpg After more than five years of design, the securing of funding and preliminary construction activities, work has officially begun on the civil construction for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

At a March 17 ceremony near the worksite on the Michigan State University campus, ground was broken for FRIB, a future national user facility supporting the mission of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy, designed to serve nuclear scientists from all over the world.

It’s also anticipated that FRIB will contribute nearly $1 billion in economic activity to the region. That includes construction, spinoff and annual DOE operational funding once FRIB begins operations.

Among those taking part in the March 17 celebration were U.S. Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow; U.S. Reps. Mike Rogers, David Camp and Tim Walberg and other members of the Michigan Congressional delegation; and Michael Knotek, deputy under secretary for science and energy, U.S. Department of Energy.

MSU Acting Provost June Youatt is the emcee.

Hear what the speakers had to say:

Senator Carl Levin
Hear the Clip 6:21 – 2.9 mb mp3

Senator Debbie Stabenow
Hear the Clip 6:42 – 3 mb mp3

Congressman Mike Rogers
Hear the Clip 3:53 – 1.8 mb mp3

Congressman Dave Camp
Hear the Clip 2:47 – 1.3 mb mp3

Congressman Tim Walberg
Hear the Clip 3:33 – 1.6 mb mp3

Governor Rick Snyder’s Chief of Staff Dennis Muchmore and audio of Gov. Snyder‘s video presentation
Hear the Clip 3:27 – 1.6 mb mp3

MSU Board of Trustees Chairman Joel Fegruson, MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon, Michael Knotek
Hear the Clip 15:37 – 7.2 mb mp3

Produced by Russ White

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

“When you live these experiences like the Rose Bowl, you’re living in the moment and don’t really have time to relish what’s happened,” Spartans head football coach Mark Dantonio tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR. “When you do get a chance to sit back and reflect, you realize it was a special time with special people at a special place.”

Dantonio says he balances all the aspects of his duties as leader of the Spartan football program by prioritizing why he’s coaching.

“For me it’s about impacting and mentoring young people and allowing football to help them reach their goals in and out of football,” he says. “We try to keep our perspective and, as naive as it may sound, not worry so much about the wins and losses.

Mark Burnham is MSU’s vice president for governmental affairs. While he’s busy planning the March 17 groundbreaking for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, he joins President Simon and AD Hollis to talk about his important role advocating for MSU in Washington and Lansing. He says getting the FRIB project to this point is his Rose Bowl moment.

He also talks about the challenges term limits present to his ability to get buy-in on some longer term projects like FRIB.

“That’s partly why we’ve established websites like MI Spartan Impact and Spartan Advocate to explain to the different regions of the state why MSU is important to them and help them realize the role MSU plays in their daily lives.” Burnham says.

jpy.jpg Hear the Conversation 31:42 – 18.1 mb mp3

“The neighborhoods were an obvious evolution for MSU, in part due to the geographic make up of the institution,” MSU acting provost June Pierce Youatt tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis. “Academic and student support services are integrated in ways that provide all the things students need in one place for academic success.

“It’s everything about students in terms of social, cultural and academic transition to MSU. Each one does have a different feel and a slightly different culture so you can shop around and find the one that feels like home to you.”

Youatt believes MSU is redefining living and learning.

“In the early ’60′s we defined it as having residential space and classrooms in the same building. We’re looking at something much more vital now.”

In terms of STEM education, Youatt says MSU is striving for “an undergraduate experience unparalleled in this country in a public institution at this scale open to all. We’re writing the book now.”

MSU research in the STEM area focuses on “how students learn these concepts, and when they don’t learn, why do they not learn? Are there other ways to structure how we teach, in what sequence we teach, and the way we teach?

“That’s at the core of what we’re doing. And then how do you transfer this knowledge into curriculum?” Read more »

D14sp.jpg Hear the Conversation 26:38 – 15.2 mb mp3

“When you live these experiences like the Rose Bowl, you’re living in the moment and don’t really have time to relish what’s happened,” Spartans head football coach Mark Dantonio tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today. “When you do get a chance to sit back and reflect, you realize it was a special time with special people at a special place.”

Dantonio says he balances all the aspects of his duties as leader of the Spartan football program by prioritizing why he’s coaching.

“For me it’s about impacting and mentoring young people and allowing football to help them reach their goals in and out of football,” he says. “We try to keep our perspective and, as naive as it may sound, not worry so much about the wins and losses.

“The chemistry of our football team really is probably why we’ve won.”

Coach D adds that his number one goal has always been to establish lasting, life-long relationships with his players.

As he begins preparing for the 2014 season, Dantonio says the Spartans are stepping back and reaffirming who they are.

“We’ll strip away everything we’ve accomplished and start back again. We work hard at not letting our guys get complacent or feel entitled. I’m excited about our players’ attitudes.”

MBvpga.jpg Hear the Conversation 22:39 – 12.9 mb mp3

Mark Burnham is MSU’s vice president for governmental affairs. While he’s busy planning the March 17 groundbreaking for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, he joins Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis to talk about his important role advocating for MSU in Washington and Lansing. He says getting the FRIB project to this point is his Rose Bowl moment.

He also talks about the challenges term limits present to his ability to get buy-in on some longer term projects like FRIB.

“That’s partly why we’ve established websites like MI Spartan Impact and Spartan Advocate to explain to the different regions of the state why MSU is important to them and help them realize the role MSU plays in their daily lives.” Burnham says.

Burnham defines the innovation deficit, and he talks about the advantages involved in Rutgers and Maryland entering the Big Ten.

Simon, Hollis, and Burnham share some of the inside stories involved in preparing for President Obama’s February 7 visit to MSU to sign the farm bill.

RMW_LAKS.jpg Hear the Conversation 17:28 – 8 mb mp3

“It’s extraordinary that the President would move out of the White House for a bill signing,” Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon tells Russ White on MSU Today, referring to President Obama‘s February 7 visit to MSU to sign the farm bill. “It’s a tribute to Senator Stabenow and the work that she put in on the bill.”

The visit, says President Simon, “is also a reflection on the role that agriculture plays for the state of Michigan.” President Simon was able to spend time with President Obama showing him how MSU research is advancing international agriculture.

Morrill Plaza was dedicated on campus on February 11. And President Simon talks about how the plaza reminds Spartan Nation to always honor its roots while it looks to the future.

Referring to her February 11 State of the University address, President Simon says she believes MSU is “in a good position coming through some extraordinary budget times with momentum.

“There’s an opportunity for us to be a leader in taking what is a traditional residential educational experience and making it much more active and engaging.”

President Simon says she wants MSU to be “a model for a high-performing organization.”

Simon believes MSU has turned a corner on the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams project, and “now the hard work begins; we have a lot of work to do because we want to be the world leader.”

She describes the Rose Bowl as an “extraordinary experience” for Spartans. And she’d like all Spartans to strive for their own “Rose Bowl moment.”

“Hopefully coming out of this Rose Bowl, people will have pride in Michigan State, not just in a football team. And they’ll have a sense that we have a collective responsibility to create Rose Bowl-equivalent experiences across the university.”

Simon says she’s pleased Governor Snyder has recommended an increase in higher education funding.

“If we’re going to be competitive 20 years from now, we have to have talent that can be competitive, and that requires education” she says. “The state needs to do its part for public universities if we’re going to have the breadth of education we need.”

MSU Today on News/Talk 760 WJR

February 6th, 2014

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 54 min – 30 mb mp3

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman talk with Big Ten and Rose Bowl champion Spartan football players Travis Jackson and Mike Sadler, and with Facility for Rare Isotope Beams project director Thomas Glasmacher.

“The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a particle accelerator where we can speed up atoms of any element from hydrogen to uranium to half the speed of light,” says Glasmacher. “It’s our job to facilitate scientific discoveries.”

On January 22, the Department of Energy Office of Science gave the FRIB official notice that it can now begin construction.

The economic competitiveness of the nation hinges on scientific discovery, says Glasmacher.

“The Rose Bowl was special,” Jackson tells Simon and Westerman. “It’s something you dream of as a kid, and to be able to live out that dream was truly remarkable. “The one thing I’ll remember is how Spartan Nation came out to support us. The stadium was as loud as any I can remember and it seemed like three quarters of the stadium was green.”

Both Jackson and Sadler tell how it was Coach D and all of MSU’s authenticity and family atmosphere that led them to come to MSU when they could have gone anywhere in the country.

Coach Dantonio and his staff really make you feel welcome here,” says Sadler. “They care about you off the field, too, and they want to see you grow and become a man.”

“I remember sitting in Coach Dantonio’s office and him telling me that he recruits people as well as players,” adds Jackson. “He also is a man of great faith, and he allows you to express yourself in the ways you want to.”

baorsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 33:48 – 19.3 mb mp3

By Hannah Watts

Bob Bao has been editor of the MSU Alumni Association magazine for more than 30 years. He’s retiring in April.

He reflects on his time at MSU with Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and MSU Alumni Association Executive Director Scott Westerman.

“Over the years I feel like I’ve come to know MIchigan State through you, not from my own personal experience, from the articles you’ve written,” says President Simon.

Two Spartan Rose Bowl victories have served as bookend memories for Bao’s career at Michigan State. “I think it’s great timing that I came here on a Rose Bowl year and I’m retiring on another Rose Bowl year,” Bao says.

Of all the time Bao’s spent at Michigan State and the individuals he interviewed, Bao says his favorite was none other than basketball superstar, Magic Johnson. “The most fun I ever had was going to Magic Johnson’s New Years Eve party,” Bao says. “Magic is obviously larger than life, and he’s the guy I’d really enjoy spending more time with just because of his love for Michigan State.”

Since Bao first started as an assistant editor of the Alumni Magazine in 1970’s, the world of desktop publishing has evolved. “Back then, the magazine was typeset by hand,” Bao says. “Today everything is done via computers. With programs like InDesign, its so easy. It’s been an amazing transformation.”

“I will always remember you as Michigan State’s quintessential storyteller,” Westerman says of Bao. “You made it possible for people who weren’t there, even in situations when you weren’t there, to feel like they were there, and they were there with Spartans.”

“You’ve done an incredible job of giving other a lens through which to see Michigan State and to feel what’s special about Michigan State,” adds President Simon.

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