The Spartan Podcast

 

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 52:54 min – 30.3 mb mp3

“It reaffirms what you’re trying to do,” Spartans football coach Mark Dantonio tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today in discussing his players and other Spartan athletes being recognized at MSU Athletics’ annual Academic Excellence Gala. “It can’t be all about football.

“When you look at the goals of our program, we have to win; I understand that. But part of this is about growth as people.”

Simon, Hollis and Dantonio talk about the value of study abroad to all MSU students, including student-athletes. And they discuss the concussion risk in college athletics. And Coach D talks about his team coming out of spring ball.

Internationally-renowned MSU water scientist Joan Rose tells Simon and Hollis that water quality is a complex, global issue. Read more »

 

gwynkraig.jpg Hear the Conversation 14:12 – 8.1 mb mp3

“I think growing up on a farm is just a fabulous way to grow up. Of course growing up on a farm you learn certain things, you learn about hard work and also the value of volunteering,” Gwyn Shelle, instructional technology specialist for the Michigan State University Extension, tells Kraig Ehm on In the Field.

Gwyn attended the CANR while a college student and received her Master’s degree in Agriculture and Extension Education. “4-H had always been a big part of my life. My thought was that I would possibly be a 4-H agent or somehow work within Extension,” Shelle explains.

For the past two years, Shelle has worked in Extension as an instructional technology specialist. “Sometimes people call me the Zoom expert, because Zoom is a tool we use to do video conferencing across the state and across the country. I may be the person people call with an idea for social media or adding active learning into their courses. Read more »

 

JRsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 25:37 – 14.6 mb mp3

Internationally-renowned MSU water scientist Joan Rose tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis that water quality is a complex, global issue.

“Water quality and its link to the biohealth of the planet is our biggest challenge, and it’s going to take us several decades to really get our arms around it,” says Rose.

Water knows no boundaries and is a global issue, according to Rose.

Rose is the 2016 recipient of the Stockholm Water Prize, announced in March at the United Nation’s World Water Day celebration in Geneva. The Stockholm Water Prize is the world’s most-prestigious water award. “The Nobel Prize of Water” Read more »

 

Brad Day SHsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 24:50 – 14.2 mb mp3

“I’ve had the opportunity to travel for Michigan State to Africa, South Asia and India. We’re everywhere,” Brad Day, associate professor and department chair for research in MSU’s Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today. “When you get off an airplane in India wearing an MSU logo, you’re a celebrity.”

Day and his team are unlocking the secrets of plants to understand how they fend off diseases, survive freezing temperatures or droughts, and they test them using state-of-the-art instrumentation, like MSU’s Growth Chamber Facility. It’s the largest of its kind at any university in the world, and it allows for the replication of the growing conditions and climate anywhere or anytime: past, present, or future. Read more »

 

MD16.jpg Hear the Conversation 25:34 – 14.6 mb mp3

“It reaffirms what you’re trying to do,” Spartans football coach Mark Dantonio tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today in discussing his players and other Spartan athletes being recognized at MSU Athletics’ annual Academic Excellence Gala. “It can’t be all about football.

“When you look at the goals of our program, we have to win; I understand that. But part of this is about growth as people.”

Simon, Hollis and Dantonio talk about the value of study abroad to all MSU students, including student-athletes.

“These are important life experiences because we want our students to have enough knowledge of the world to affect public policy in a positive way and to be leaders. So they have to have a variety of experiences, and some of them have risks to them,” says Simon. Read more »

 

EDsp.jpg Hear the Conversation 31:59 – 18.3 mb mp3

Forty six years ago on April 22, 1970 we celebrated the inaugural Earth Day. Over four decades later Earth Day is an international phenomenon, and global sustainability issues are constantly in the news.

Greening of the Great Lakes host Kirk Heinze convened a panel of environmental advocates to discuss the significance of Earth Day and key environmental issues.

Jack Schmitt is the deputy director of the Michigan League of Conservation Voters, James Clift is the policy director for the Michigan Environmental Council, and George Heartwell is the former three-term mayor of Grand Rapids. Read more »

 

Rose Heinze.jpg Hear the Conversation 15:48 – 9 mb mp3

“I’m so honored, and I think it represents a platform to start addressing water quality and health at the global level,” MSU Professor Joan Rose tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes. “I’m part of a global community that is so passionate about people’s health and how water quality affects that.”

Rose was the recipient in March of the world’s most prestigious water award, the Stockholm Water Prize. A global water science expert and Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research at Michigan State University, Rose is recognized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) for her research on microbial risk to human health in water, her successful translation of the science to policy makers, and for her leadership in developing the tools and guidelines required to give policy and regulatory life to the science.

The goal of the Global Water Pathogen Project, says Rose, is to make new information technology and knowledge more accessible for decision making. Read more »

 

16energy.jpg Hear the Conversation 19:00 – 10.8 mb mp3

“I think we’re making good progress,” Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes. “The goal is to more effectively be ‘green’ while at the same time balancing the plant’s effectiveness.”

President Simon headlined the April 12 Conversation with the President on MSU’s Energy Future, where she announced that MSU is no longer burning coal at its on-campus power plant. She joined Heinze after the panel discussion.

“We believe that MSU can have an environmentally sustainable set of values and be prudent financially while implementing those values in a complex environment,” Simon adds. Read more »

 

wjr_logo.jpg Hear the Show 52:54 min – 30.3 mb mp3

“It’s the relationships that I’ve gained throughout my time here,” Spartan Football player Riley Bullough tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today in reflecting on the highlight of his time at MSU. “And being able to sustain those relationships after college is a focus for me as I come into my senior year.”

“With me, it was just something about Michigan State that caught my eye – the loyalty within the program and the people that make Michigan State what it is. That’s what made me come here,” says Wisconsin native R.J. Shelton.

Michigan State University, with the support of Anheuser-Busch, will lead a nationwide effort focused on changing behaviors and cultural misperceptions on issues related to alcohol and drug use on college campuses. Read more »

 

Howes142.jpg Hear the Conversation 16:59 – 9.7 mb mp3

“This is one of the fundamental challenges facing the United States auto industry,” Detroit News business columnist and associate business editor Daniel Howes tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes in discussing the future of autonomous vehicles. “This is a battle for technological edge and competitive advantage between Detroit’s auto industry and tech companies in Silicon Valley.”

General Motors and Ford, in particular, adds Howes “understand that they’re facing some fundamental change in the industry, but they don’t think the traditional business is going to go away anytime soon.”

Howes says Silicon Valley companies “are looking for the next big chunk of growth as a way to maintain the growth and earnings momentum they’ve been delivering to the marketplace, and one of the places they see that is in transportation. Read more »

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